History is made

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4639584/First-woman-command-troops-guarding-Queen.html

 

Canadian soldier, 24, makes history as she becomes the first woman to command the troops guarding the Queen at Buckingham Palace

  • Canadian Captain Megan Couto, 24, has been given the prestigious role of Captain of the Queen’s Guard
  • She is one of a number of Canadian troops invited to serve as the Queen’s Guard until July 3 
  • Today she marched her troops from Wellington Barracks to Buckingham Palace for the Changing of the Guard
  • All Canadian military roles are open to women but restrictions in Britain means no woman has held been Captain of the Queen’s Guard 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-4639584/First-woman-command-troops-guarding-Queen.html#ixzz4l7IuubCh
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Vestiges of the Vikings: Magic Buried in a Viking Woman’s Grave

Source: http://www.ancient-origins.net/artifacts-other-artifacts/vestiges-vikings-magic-buried-viking-womans-grave-006800

 

Vestiges of the Vikings: Magic Buried in a Viking Woman's Grave

Vestiges of the Vikings: Magic Buried in a Viking Woman’s Grave

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Murky, elusive and undefined, the religion of the pre-Christian Vikings has long been subject to debate. Contemporary texts of their spiritual worship do not survive, and the later records that do survive stem from Christian authors. Thus they are tainted with a Christian worldview and anti-pagan opinions. The magic of the Vikings, however, is somewhat a secondary field of interest. Though intricately linked with the pagan beliefs of the Norse, it is in many ways more undefined due to the ritual sacrifice of magical items.

In 1894, a curved metal rod was discovered in a 9 th-10th century female grave in Romsdal, Norway. Scholars have debated its intention for years, shuffling between theories that it was a “fishing hook or a spit for roasting meat”, before realizing in 2013 that it was likely a form of a magic wand. The bend toward the top of the wand was seemingly made just before the wand was laid to rest with the woman, as if to stem its magical properties. This particular wand fits the traditional mold of a seiðr wand based on previous discoveries dating from the 9 th and 10 th centuries. It is long (at 90cm), made of iron (consistent with the materials circulating of the Norse Iron Age) with “knobs attached to them” for the benefit of the wielder.

The Viking metal rod that is believed to have been a magic wand.

The Viking metal rod that is believed to have been a magic wand. Credit: Trustees of the British Museum

It is important to note that it was very common in Viking funerary traditions for weapons or items to be ceremoniously broken or bent before burial. Though the exact reasons for these actions are uncertain, it is believed by scholars such as Thomas DuBois and Neil Price that such alterations were part of the funeral itself. The weapons of a warrior, for instance, or the wand of a witch, in this case, were forcibly made impotent or non-functional just as the warrior could no longer fight, and the witch could no longer perform magic.

 

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Rare discovery in Bronze Age tomb prompts new consideration of Greek history

http://www.corespirit.com/thousands-years-old-shaman-sanctuary-discovered-europe/

 

When University of Cincinnati researchers uncovered the tomb of a Bronze Age warrior—left untouched for more than 3,500 years and packed with a spectacular array of precious jewelry, weapons and riches—the discovery was hailed by experts as “the find of a lifetime.”

Now, only a year after archaeologists completed the excavation, new understandings of the artifacts—particularly the discovery of four golden rings—and the insights they provide to the origins of Greek civilization may prove to be the team’s next big discovery.

Shari Stocker, a senior research associate in UC’s Department of Classics, and Jack Davis, the university’s Carl W. Blegen chair in Greek archaeology, will reveal the UC-based team’s findings from the so-called “Griffin Warrior” grave Thursday, Oct. 6, at The American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece.

The husband-and-wife team’s highly anticipated lecture is generating worldwide attention, including a feature in the New York Times.

The ‘find of a lifetime’

Stocker and Davis, along with other UC staff specialists and students, stumbled upon the remarkably undisturbed and intact tomb last May while excavating near the city of Pylos, an ancient city on the southwest coast of Greece.

Inside they discovered the well-preserved remains of what is believed to have been a powerful Mycenaean warrior or priest in his early- to mid-30s who was buried around 1500 B.C. near the archeological excavation of the Palace of Nestor.

Immortalized in Homer’s “Odyssey,” the large administrative center was destroyed by fire sometime around 1180 B.C., but remains the best-preserved Bronze Age palace on the Greek mainland. UC archaeologist Carl Blegen first discovered the Mycenaean ruins in 1939, where he unearthed a number of clay tablets written in Linear B script, the earliest known written form of Greek.

The warrior’s tomb, hailed by the Greek Culture Ministry as the “most important to have been discovered [in continental Greece] in 65 years,” revealed more than 2,000 objects arrayed on and around the body, including four solid gold rings, silver cups, precious stone beads, fine-toothed ivory combs and an intricately built sword, among other weapons.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-10-lord-rare-discovery-bronze-age.html#jCp

Manvotional: A Man’s Religion Is the Chief Fact About Him

Originally posted by Brett & Kate McKay on the Blog The Art of Manliness:

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2016/05/14/manvotional-a-mans-religion-is-the-chief-fact-about-him/

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From On Heroes and Hero Worship and the Heroic in Society, 1840
By Thomas Carlyle

It is well said, in every sense, that a man’s religion is the chief fact with regard to him. A man’s, or a nation of men’s.

By religion I do not mean here the church-creed which he professes, the articles of faith which he will sign and, in words or otherwise, assert; not this wholly, in many cases not this at all. We see men of all kinds of professed creeds attain to almost all degrees of worth or worthlessness under each or any of them. This is not what I call religion, this profession andassertion; which is often only a profession and assertion from the outworks of the man, fromthe mere argumentative region of him, if even so deep as that.

But the thing a man does practically believe (and this is often enough without asserting it even to himself, much less to others); the thing a man does practically lay to heart, andknow for certain, concerning his vital relations to this mysterious Universe, and his duty anddestiny there, that is in all cases the primary thing for him, and creatively determines all therest. That is his religion; or, it may be, his mere skepticism and no-religion: the manner it isin which he feels himself to be spiritually related to the Unseen World or No-World; and I say, if you tell me what that is, you tell me to a very great extent what the man is, what thekind of things he will do is.

Of a man or of a nation we inquire, therefore, first of all, What religion they had? Was it Heathenism,—plurality of gods, mere sensuous representation of this Mystery of Life, andfor chief recognized element therein Physical Force? Was it Christianism; faith in an Invisible, not as real only, but as the only reality; Time, through every meanest moment of it, resting on Eternity; Pagan empire of Force displaced by a nobler supremacy, that of Holiness? Was it Skepticism, uncertainty and inquiry whether there was an Unseen World, any Mystery of Life except a mad one;—doubt as to all this, or perhaps unbelief and flat denial?

Answering of this question is giving us the soul of the history of the man or nation. The thoughts they had were the parents of the actions they did; their feelings were parents of their thoughts: it was the unseen and spiritual in them that determined the outward and actual;—their religion, as I say, was the great fact about them.