Margot Adler, An NPR Journalist For Three Decades, Dies : NPR

Margot Adler, An NPR Journalist For Three Decades, Dies

I loved her book. I loved her reporting. I cannot say just how much she influenced me. I am already missing her voice on my radio.

Margot Adler, seen here in 2006, was a longtime reporter for NPR. She died Monday following a battle with cancer.

Margot Adler, seen here in 2006, was a longtime reporter for NPR. She died Monday following a battle with cancer.

Michael Paras/NPR

Margot Adler, one of the signature voices on NPR’s airwaves for more than three decades, died Monday at her home in New York City. She was 68 and had been battling cancer.

Margot joined the NPR staff as a general assignment reporter in 1979. She went on to cover everything from the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic to confrontations involving the Ku Klux Klan in Greensboro, N.C., to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

“Her reporting was singular and her voice distinct,” Margaret Low Smith, NPR’s vice president for news, said in an announcement to staff. “There was almost no story that Margot couldn’t tell.”

The granddaughter of renowned Viennese psychiatrist Alfred Adler, Margot was born in Little Rock, Ark., but spent most of her life in Manhattan.

More recently, Margot reported on cultural affairs and the arts. She landed the first U.S. radio interview with author J.K. Rowling, and she recently released Out for Blood, a meditation on society’s fascination with vampires.

Margot explained to NPR’s Neal Conan that research for the book began when her husband of 33 years was diagnosed with terminal cancer.

“He was the healthiest man on the planet, I mean literally,” Margot said. “You know, he was a runner. Unlike me, he’d never done any drugs in the ’60s. He’d never smoked. He ate perfectly, you know, one of these people. And he only lived nine months.”

Read the full article from NPR here

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The Secrets of the Nebra Sky Disc | Ancient Origins

The Secrets of the Nebra Sky Disc | Ancient Origins.

The Nebra Sky Disc is a 3,600-year-old bronze disc which, according to UNESCO, features “the oldest concrete depiction of cosmic phenomena worldwide.”  The disc is such an extraordinary piece that it was initially believed to be an archaeological forgery.  However, detailed scientific analysis revealed that it is indeed authentic and the precious artefact is now included in UNESCO’s ‘Memory of the World’ register, an international initiative launched to safeguard the documentary heritage of humanity, and is being held in the State Museum of Prehistory in Halle. The Nebra Sky Disc was discovered in 1999 by two amateur treasure hunters illegally using a metal detector in Ziegelroda Forest, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.  It had been ritually buried in a prehistoric enclosure atop a hill (the Mittelberg), along with two precious swords, two axes, two spiral arm-rings and one bronze chisel. The enclosure is oriented in such a way that the sun seems to set every solstice behind the Brocken, the highest peak of the Harz Mountains, some 80 km to the north-west. The surrounding area is known to have been settled since the Neolithic, and Ziegelroda Forest is said to contain around 1,000 barrows.

The swords found with the Nebra sky disc

The swords found with the disc. Photo source: Wikipedia 

See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-technology/secrets-nebra-sky-disc-001526#!bc1RGy